Seagrove, a beach neighborhood that locals and guests love. Lush oak trees, magnolias, and pines have spread deep roots in Seagrove — and so have long-time visitors who keep coming back. Seagrove Beach got its name from the thick grove of windswept oak trees along the beach. At the beginning of the 20th Century, Seagrove Beach was known as Russ’s Hammock. You could get here by taking a small road from the north by way of Point Washington, a small timber mill town. One of the few, original property owners to settle here was the McGee family in 1949.

Outside of a few cottages and the little Seagrove Hotel, there wasn’t much development at that time. The only way to drive to Seagrove was on a sandy trail from the paved, U.S. Highway 98. The current road 30-A, was just a simple dirt road a few hundred feet in both directions. Until they paved 30-A there was no connecting road from Seagrove to Grayton Beach, because the two towns were separated by Western Lake. The only way to get from either town to the other was by boat.

Laid-back but luxurious, Seagrove is a place that embraces variety. From upscale boutiques to casual cafes, this beach neighborhood offers a little bit of everything — including two rare coastal dune lakes, a state park, and sugar-white sand.

 


Ray Jackson Construction
114 Logan Lane, Suite 1b
Santa Rosa Beach, Florida 32459
Ph: 850-534-0499
Fax: 850-534-0498